Fire Prevention Week 2011 LogoAs the 2011 Fire Prevention Week continues, our members continue to assist the community and local businesses with their fire prevention education events. St. Paul's Preschool is one of our annual education events, teaching their students ranging from 3 - 4 years old about the importance of fire safety and prevention. They get the opportunity to have a visit from our members, see our apparatus, gear, equipment, etc. The older students take a short walk to the station, and get a tour of the station along with the fire safety and prevention information.

Here are a few tips from the National Fire Prevention Association:

Home Fire Sprinklers
  • Automatic fire sprinkler systems cut the risk of dying in a home fire by about 80%.
  • Home fire sprinklers can contain and may even extinguish a fire in less time than it would take the fire department to arrive on the scene.
  • Sprinklers are highly effective because they react so quickly in a fire. They reduce the risk of death or injury from a fire because they dramatically reduce the heat, flames and smoke produced, allowing people time to evacuate the home.
Smoke Alarms 
  • Roughly two-thirds of home fire deaths happen in homes with no smoke alarms or no working smoke alarms. About one in five smoke alarm failures was due to dead batteries.
  • Working smoke alarms cut the risk of dying in reported home fires in half.
  • In fires considered large enough to activate the smoke alarm, hardwired alarms operated 91% of the time, while battery powered alarms operated only 75% of the time.

Heating
  • Fires involving heating equipment peak in December, January and February, as do deaths from these fires. Overall, homes fires and home fire deaths are also more common in the cooler months of the year.
  • Heating equipment was the second leading cause of all reported home fires and home fire deaths.
  • The leading factor contributing to heating equipment fires was failure to clean, principally creosote from solid fueled heating equipment, primarily chimneys.
  • Half of home heating fire deaths resulted from fires caused by heating equipment too close to things that can burn, such as upholstered furniture, clothing, mattresses or bedding.
  • U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 64,100 heating-related home fires each year between 2005-2009, causing an average of 560 deaths, 1,620 injuries and $904 million in direct property damage.
Electrical
  • 41% of home electrical fires involved electrical distribution or lighting equipment.
  • 53% of home electrical fires involved other known types of equipment, including ranges, washers/dryers, fans and space heaters.
  • During 2005-2009, electrical distribution and lighting equipment was involved in the ignition of 23,400 home structure fires, on average, per year. These fires caused an average of 390 deaths, 970 injuries and $822 million in direct property damage.
Candles 
  • On average, there are 35 home candle fires reported per day.
  • Roughly two-fifths of these fires started in the bedroom.
  • More than half of all candle fires start when things that can burn are too close to the candle.
  • During 2005-2009, candles caused an average of 12,900 home fires, 140 home fire deaths, 1,040 home fire injuries and $471 million in direct property damage.
Cooking 
  • Cooking equipment is the leading cause of home structure fires and associated injuries, and was tied for the third leading cause of home fire deaths.
  • Unattended cooking was by far the leading cause of these fires.
  • Households using electric ranges have a higher risk of fires than those using gas ranges.
  • Children under five face a higher risk of non-fire burns associated with cooking than being burned in a cooking fire.
  • Nearly half (45%) of microwave oven injuries seen at emergency rooms in 2009 were scalds.
  • U.S. fire departments responded to an average of 155,400 cooking-related home fires each year between 2005-2009, causing an average of 390 deaths, 4,800 injuries and $771 million in direct property damage.


"Reproduced from NFPA's Fire Prevention Week website, www.firepreventionweek.org. ©2011 NFPA."